Clayton Act

The Clayton Antitrust Act of 1914 (Pub.L. 63–212, 38 Stat. 730, enacted October 15, 1914, codified at 15 U.S.C. §§ 12–27, 29 U.S.C. §§ 52–53), was a part of United States antitrust law with the goal of adding further substance to the U.S. antitrust law regime; the Clayton Act sought to prevent anticompetitive practices in their incipiency. That regime started with the Sherman Antitrust Act of 1890, the first Federal law outlawing practices considered harmful to consumers (monopolies, cartels, and trusts). The Clayton Act specified particular prohibited conduct, the three-level enforcement scheme, the exemptions, and the remedial measures.
Posts about Clayton Act
  • Intellectual Ventures Prevails In Capital One Antitrust Suit

    … based upon a previous decision in a New York federal case, which found those same two patents to be ineligible under Section 101. The patent aspects of the action were appealed, and in 2017, the Federal Circuit affirmed. Capital One’s Antitrust Counterclaims Meanwhile, the district court allowed litigation to proceed over IV’s antitrust counterclaims…

    Michael E. Mccabe Jr./ IPethics & INsights- 21 readers -