Change

  • What Lawyers Will Do as Technology Takes Over (Part 1)

    Source: Impact Lab The 2014 lawyer will not be successful in 2024, and that is good for all of us. We focus our energy today on technology and its relentless expansion into our lives. We spend relatively little time, however, talking about where lawyers must go as that expansion occurs. Over three posts, I’m going to explore where I think the role of lawyers will move as te ...

    6 readers - Kenneth Grady/ SeytLines
  • Lawyers, the End is Not Nigh for You Bring Wisdom

    “This is the end My only friend, the end Of our elaborate plans, the end Of everything that stands, the end” — The Doors, “The End” In the latest lawpocalypse article, Ryan McClead presents us with his thoughtful view of a future where computers tend the clients and lawyers tend the computers. Mr.

    3 readers - Kenneth Grady/ SeytLines
    • What Lawyers Will Do as Technology Takes Over (Part 3)

      In the first part of this three part series, I explored left brain (L-Directed) and right brain (R-Directed) thinking. In the second part, I talked about how technology takes over L-Directed Thinking. In this last part, I’ll talk about what lawyers will do after L-Directed thinking moves to computers.
      3 readers - Kenneth Grady/ SeytLines
    • A Skinnerian View of Why Lawyers Don’t Change (Part 2)

      In part 1 of this series, posted yesterday, I talked about B.F. Skinner’s operant conditioning theory and lawyer personality traits that drive resistance to change. Good Times Improve Change Resistance So how do these characteristics, lawyers and change, and the PwC Survey, tie together? Let’s go back to the PwC Survey.
      3 readers - Kenneth Grady/ SeytLines
    • A Skinnerian View of Why Lawyers Don’t Change (Part 1)

      Why oh why won’t lawyers change? I hear and read this lament daily. It fills discussions at conferences among those who advocate for change and it populates the tweets of legal industry pundits. We have a long list of reasons explaining why lawyers resist change. The list includes risk aversion, skepticism, ignorance, and even depression.
      1 readers - Kenneth Grady/ SeytLines
    • The 300 Lawyers

      Gideon chooses the 300. On Thursday morning, many of us attending the ACC’s 2014 Annual Meeting participated in an event I feel comfortable saying no one has witnessed before – a process mapping extravaganza with around 300 people mapping at the same time. To those of you who participated in the event, my congratulations on a job well done.
      1 readers - Kenneth Grady/ SeytLines

    The latest about Change

    • The 300 Lawyers

      … to put in the way of change. You know those barriers. We can’t improve how we do things because: ☐ We don’t have the time; ☐ We don’t have the money; ☐ We don’t have the people; ☐ We don’t have the knowledge; ☐ We don’t have the technology; ☐ All of the above. Let’s call these the 6 Myths. In the 90 minutes we had for the Contractathon…

      1 readers - Kenneth Grady/ SeytLines
    • A Skinnerian View of Why Lawyers Don’t Change (Part 1)

      … of behavior, called operant conditioning. If you remember Pavolv’s dog, you remember the core idea underlying operant conditioning. According to this theory, positive reinforcement adds a stimulus causing the subject to maintain or increase the frequency of a behavior, and negative reinforcement removes a stimulus causing the subject to maintain…

      1 readers - Kenneth Grady/ SeytLines
    • What Lawyers Will Do as Technology Takes Over (Part 1)

      … of this post. By the way, for those of you who feel your “what does Pink know about law” skepticism rising, consider these facts. While he never practiced law, he graduated from Yale Law School and was editor-in-chief of The Yale Law & Policy Review. Meet the Right Hemisphere So if the left side of our brain has dominated the Information Age…

      6 readers - Kenneth Grady/ SeytLines
    • Lawyers, the End is Not Nigh for You Bring Wisdom

      … processing power every two to three years), means that the tipping point shift from lawyer processor to computer processor is on the near horizon. I believe the shift will take longer. Well-entrenched lawyer resistance to change, the lack of key incentives to change, regulatory resistance in the US, and the rather small market size for products…

      3 readers - Kenneth Grady/ SeytLines
    • Managing the Transition Through Change

      … There are two kinds of change – change you want and change you don’t want. That’s an oversimplification, of course, but, according to Tom Meier, an HR consultant speaking at a conference I recently attended, how we manage the transition through change depends very much on whether we view it as a desirable or undesirable change. Meier laid out…

      5 readers - Karen Dyck/ Slaw
    • Why a Computer Won’t Replace Law Firm Associates Tomorrow

      … very large buckets. The first bucket is the easier of the two. It involves queries such as: find a case that supports the statement I am making in my brief. If I want to say “granting summary judgment in a patent infringement case is appropriate in the Federal Third Circuit when …” I need a case supporting that statement. As I understand Viv, she…

      5 readers - Kenneth Grady/ SeytLines
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